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Tag opportunities

ISPA Reports Training & Treatments Will Enhance Spa Growth

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As reported by Skin Inc magazine, The International Spa Association (ISPA) released its annual 2015 U.S. Spa Industry Study yesterday, covering details about the industry’s growth statistics, a picture of U.S. spa facilities and treatments, and a profile of the spa industry.

The study is jam-packed with in-depth insight about the spa industry over the past year—including the fact that total industry revenue has well surpassed the $15 billion mark—but we are highlighting six key takeaways that stand out.

1. Employment in the spa industry stands at record level.

Employment in the spa industry is estimated to be at 360,000 as of May 2015, which is a 2.9% increase (more than 10,000 new jobs) over the same time last year.

Increasing staffing levels was strongest among day spas—48% said they increased employment levels.

Although both full- and part-time positions rose, the number of independent contractor positions fell by 6.5%. ISPA notes this reduction has been occurring yearly since 2010.

2. Individual spa establis­hments are making more money.

The average revenue for a single spa location has risen to $749,000 in 2014, which is an increase of 2.9% from the prior year.

3. Spas’ marketing tactics are attracting clients

Total spa visits were 6.7% higher in 2014 than the year before. And average visits per spa rose 4.3% (8,500) from 2013 to 2014.

4. Revenue per spa visit has declined.

Despite a strong rise in spa visits, the amount of money spas are making on an average visit has dropped slightly by 1.3% from $89 in 2013 to $88 in 2014.

ISPA suggests this could be due to several factors, including: due to busy lifestyles, clients may be visiting more frequently, but choosing shorter treatments; spas introducing express treatments; discounting; and raising prices competitive marketplace proves challenging for spas.

5. Spa visits are being integrated as a staple of a healthy lifestyle.

ISPA asked survey respondents on what they believe the next trend to shape the industry will be, stating that trends related to wellness, health and fitness were the most frequently cited trends. One in two respondents mentioned one or more wellness-related trend.

6. Spas are building on this momentum.

When ISPA asked spas about their plans for 2015, most spas said they intended to take actions to enhance their business. A few things spas plan to add in 2015 include:

– See more at: http://www.skininc.com/spabusiness/trends/2015-ISPA-Spa-Industry-Study-Six-Key-Takeaways-330404281.html#sthash.9ySjmyVJ.xkl6pCLW.dpuf

New Retail Spa Training Class Brings Sexy Back

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Remember when retail spa training was sexy?

Neither do I.

It’s scary, expensive and time consuming- – not sexy.

What if it were friendly, affordable and convenient?

That’s sexy! That’s why today I’m thrilled to launch Increasing Your Retail Selling: An Online Training Class for Spa Managers“. Yes spa managers I’ve heard your call. Read More

What 7-11 Teaches Us About Spa Selling

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Anyone who is passionate about their work knows that it can be difficult to turn off sometimes. This is particularly true with customer service because good or bad, it’s always around us.

As a spa sales trainer I look everywhere for inspiration and the elusive key that will unlock the door to perfect service delivery.  It’s doesn’t matter if I’m having dinner at a sky bar restaurant or buying a bag of freshly sliced fruit from a street cart vendor. I always notice how they deliver their service.   Read More

What’s Your Retail Strategy for Mother’s Day?

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This weekend heralds in one of the largest spending holidays during the year, Mother’s Day. In the United States alone, 2.35 billion was spent on flowers. Spas generated a not too shabby 1.47 billion in revenue earnings. Read More

Customization-the Key to Attracting Men

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Doug Chambers, founder/principal of Blu Spas, Inc. stated  “A key to understanding the male skin care market is to understand that customization is just as relevant to the male market as it is to the female market. All too often spa menus feature multiple facial options unmistakably crafted for women and a single one-size-fits-all facial for men.”

A more customized experience for men should be the goal, accommodating the individual needs and desires of your target male market.

One way to begin that process is to identify which products among your retail selection are ideal for men. But with the wide range of products now available specifically suited to men’s needs, there is no longer an excuse for not having a section of your spa menu and products dedicated to the the fellas.

Read the complete article- 4 Strategies to Capture the Men’s Skin Care Market http://bit.ly/1Qi8Bbr

Ten Ways to Please Your Global Clients

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Social media and news outlets are bringing us closer together minute by minute. Air travel is faster and more frequent; most areas of the world can be accessed within 24 hours. Opportunities to conduct business with a global clientele are increasing exponentially. So what can spa therapists do to help build a brand which attracts and maintains the attention of  treatment lovers from around the world?

What’s guaranteed to work every time and garner rave reviews on social media sites? Check this out-

Smile. A smile is a universal welcoming signal that crosses all boundaries and immediately puts your client at ease. Further engagement with the guest is mandatory and serves to benefit the therapist as well so make sure that the charm is dialed on high.

Interview your client. Use that intake form to begin your conversation.with your client.  Everyone’s situation and reason for visiting the spa is different. Give men the same amount of time and respect for discussion as women, their needs are often just as pressing. Don’t assume anything, ask questions and listen well.

Don’t categorize your clients. When it comes to skin and body care, knowledge of the  Fitzpatrick Classification Scale is not enough.  Multi-ethnicity is everywhere and creates some very interesting characteristics that probably weren’t covered in your massage or aesthetics classes.  Gather as much information as possible, this will help to ensure great service.

Make the client comfortable. People come in all shapes and sizes. Have a plan in case a plus sized or small person walks into your spa. Be sensitive to the hairstyles of your clients. If she (or he) has a lot of hair offer her two headbands rather than one. Don’t assume that the hair is all hers. Ask if its OK before plunging your hands into someone’s mane to perform a  head massage.  If you are performing facial services on a bald man give his head some love too. It’s exposed to the sun and needs care.

Cleanse, remove and check.  When I worked as a makeup artist for a spa, I would frequently have to remove leftover makeup from my client’s  neck or traces of masque from their nostrils, post facial. If a man has facial hair, masque may cling to his face. Check your clients in the daylight before sending them back out in public. They’ll  appreciate your attentiveness.

Use your loupe. Don’t trust your lying eyes. Examine the skin closely under a magnifying lamp and report your findings to your client.

Be gentle. You will never go wrong if you treat all skin with respect. There is a commonly held belief that darker skin tones can tolerate more aggressive products.  The opposite is true. Here’s the rule of thumb: If you are causing pain to your client, you are probably causing damage. This will get your name on social media quickly but not in a good way.

Avoid extractions.   A good practice is to focus on providing clients with skin that is polished, luminous and smooth to the touch. No one on vacation wants their skin to look damaged. If your client returns to you often, you can then create a schedule for deep cleaning and extractions.

Make product recommendations  Almost no one travels a distance and gets a treatment to not take something  home with them. Therapists have problems selling because they fail to initially engage with their client. If you have a product  that you really believe in or that worked incredibly well during treatment share the knowledge with your client. Recommend that they buy another for gifting, especially if it’s unique to your spa.

Make care recommendations   One of the ways to show true interest in your client is a final written recommendation for body and skin treatments once they return home. Create a three month schedule for them to follow, include a sentiment thanking them for visiting the spa. Send it to their email address. They will  appreciate the reminder to take care of themselves and likely follow your expert advice.

 

5 Shocking Secrets of Spa Therapists  

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I am based in Asia however it seems that when it comes to the spa industry in general, “don’t ask don’t tell” is the policy that folks often operate from. I had a massage the other day at a Five-Star hotel in my neighborhood. It was serviceable enough and I left feeling better. It was everything else that happened around the service which made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Read More

How Therapists Can Crash Their Way to Sales Success

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My father used to tell my sister and me that whenever something looked easy, it was probably because the person doing it was very good at it.  He would say that unbeknownst to us that person had been practicing for a very long time and there was no such thing as instant mastery or “overnight sensation”. Most of us found this to be true the first time we attempted to “moonwalk” like Michael Jackson. Read More