Tag managers

Tag managers

The Therapist – Management Retail Disconnect

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There are currently 32,930 vacant positions for therapists in the US spa industry and 1,030 for managers. Inspired by these findings from its annual Spa Industry Study, the International Spa Association (ISPA) Foundation commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) to conduct a global study to get underneath the reasons for the high number of vacancies.  Read More

Examine the beliefs that no longer serve you

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In 2017 Nancy Griffin, president of Contento Marketing issued a brilliant report on retail. It was stated that “seventy-five percent of spa managers felt their low retail revenues were caused by staff resistance”. 

I wonder if the managers ever thought to offer training that was structured for how introverts learn. Were they even aware that 95% of therapists are introverts? 

This excerpt from an article by Mary Jo Asmus provides another perspective.   Read More

FIVE TIPS TO INCREASE SPA RETAIL SALES IN 2017

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When I consult with spa managers in the United States they often tell me that their number one problem is getting their staff to sell retail products. The past three years spent working in Asia has shown me that the same challenges exist.

Their solution has frequently been to increase product training, and to remind their staff more often how important selling is. This rarely fixes the problem because they are not addressing the root cause.

The spa industry has failed to recognize that most of its therapists are introverts by nature. They are quiet people who prefer the peaceful environment which so many spas offer. They work in subdued lighting. Customer interactions are mostly one on one. Because communication occurs largely through touch, the need to speak is kept to a minimum. This suits them just fine as introverts are not huge fans of small talk.

However, most therapists have nurturing spirits. They will bend over backwards to relieve someone’s pain. And as introverts they tend to be great listeners.

The good news is that listening well is at the heart of engagement. And engagement is the key to selling retail products.

For many therapists, customer engagement is initially very difficult. But once the stress and trepidation they experience from second guessing themselves is removed, they  become the retail superstars that they are meant to be. And it happens rapidly.

Here are some tips that may help you position your team for more success in increasing your retail sales.

Tip # 1-Ask your therapists what gets in the way of their selling. Address their concerns and fears with empathy and honesty.

Tips # 2-. Divide your team into groups of three. Have them give a one minute presentation to their peers on something they love.

Tip # 3-Have the listeners repeat back what they heard the presenter say. This will help to build listening skills.

Tip # 4-In private provide positive feedback to the presenters on their presentation strengths. Guide them on improving their weaknesses.

Tip # 5-Using their strengths, repeat the presentation process using a retail product that they like. Roleplay presenting to a customer during down-time.

Join me at #ISPA2017 for Introverts: The Secret of Increasing Retail Sales.

 

Real Talk-Is Your Spa Receptionist Just Pretty?

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Spa managers who achieve high retail sales know that a strong front desk team is worth their weight in gold. Conversely, show me a spa with low retail sales and chances are great that the receptionists are weak in product knowledge.

Recently I trained a city spa team with product sales that hovered around 6%. (25% and higher is ideal) Staff included three receptionists all of whom had worked there for over a year. A technique that I always use is to ask the front desk staff to tell me their complete skin care regimen based upon the products on the shelves. This does several things; it allows me to gauge their knowledge, comfort in explaining product use, enthusiasm for the brands and level of engagement.

None of the receptionists were well versed enough to inform me of an entire daily routine. Despite the fact that the spa carries only three brands, they have complete access to product samples and serve as treatment models during training, they were somewhat clueless.

I wonder what happens when guests come in to purchase products?

In contrast, high performing teams always have strong receptionists. They are more than just pretty. They’re highly engaging and product obsessed! If your guest has last minute  doubts or questions about their purchase, a good receptionist calls upon their personal experience with the products. They can provide the reassurance necessary to close the sale.

For managers with a weak front desk staff, resolving knowledge gaps and apathy is not difficult to resolve. Take these five steps:

1. Ensure that down time is spent familiarizing themselves with your products.

2. Ask product related questions frequently.

3. Conduct role play sessions with them.

4. Include product knowledge expertise as part of their performance review.

5. Create a program to incentivize sales.

This is something that you can begin today.

Consider that your front desk is first and last contact for your guests. Make the experience excellent.

 

How Spas Skyrocket from Bronze to Gold

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Day Spa Association cited an interesting statistic in their latest Snapshot Report;

Spas that generated 20% or higher in retail could potentially improved their sales by as much as 14%.

This is not surprising as success tends to breed more success. But if you’re in that lower 20% group and desperately want to make a giant leap into the elite 30% plus club,  how do you make it happen? Read More

SE Asia’s Men’s Wellness Tourism Primed for Growth

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Wellness tourism is projected for an 11 percent compound annual growth rate through 2020, according to Technavio analysts. Primary wellness tourists traveling internationally outspend the average international tourist by at least 60 percent, signaling a growing and valuable revenue stream for hotels.

The growth of Southeast Asia, namely Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam, is also projected to fuel the market. Read More