Tag engagement

Tag engagement

What United’s “Aisle Drag” Can Teach the Spa Industry

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Tess Taylor’s article “Is soft skills development the answer to better customer treatment?” is applicable across many businesses. With retail sales and customer retention always top of mind for the spa and wellness industry I found the title to be particularly poignant.  Read More

The Dying Art Of Customer Service

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This excerpt written by spa consultant Kamillya Hunter strikes at the heart of our profession. Her poignant article gives us all something to think about.  

There is no other profession more personal than massage therapy. If you disagree, name one. I’ll wait. As massage therapists, we expect a fully conscious person to agree to remove their clothes and expose to us parts of themselves they may be ashamed of. Read More

Introverts: The Secret of Increasing Retail Sales at ISPA2017

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Despite the disproportionate number of introverts in the spa industry, most retail sales training is still presented from a traditional perspective geared toward outgoing personalities. Join me at ISPA2017 in Las Vegas on Wednesday, October 18, 2017  8 – 9 AM. Read More

What I Discovered Teaching Spa Retail in China

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China is a spa and wellness boom town. According to the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) report, in 2016 China drove the biggest recent gains in wellness tourism revenues (300%+).

I recently returned from Shanghai, China to deliver my Increasing Your Retail Selling program to a spa team at a renowned Five-Star hotel. Read More

Is the Spa Industry Walking Its Talk?

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Competition in the beauty sector is fierce, with spas and salons up against department stores and retail outlets for consumer sales. An obvious competitive advantage that we have over beauty counters are our therapists; trained licensed professionals with in-depth knowledge of skin and body. However, this advantage must be leveraged beyond mere product training. Read More

FIVE TIPS TO INCREASE SPA RETAIL SALES IN 2017

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When I consult with spa managers in the United States they often tell me that their number one problem is getting their staff to sell retail products. The past three years spent working in Asia has shown me that the same challenges exist.

Their solution has frequently been to increase product training, and to remind their staff more often how important selling is. This rarely fixes the problem because they are not addressing the root cause.

The spa industry has failed to recognize that most of its therapists are introverts by nature. They are quiet people who prefer the peaceful environment which so many spas offer. They work in subdued lighting. Customer interactions are mostly one on one. Because communication occurs largely through touch, the need to speak is kept to a minimum. This suits them just fine as introverts are not huge fans of small talk.

However, most therapists have nurturing spirits. They will bend over backwards to relieve someone’s pain. And as introverts they tend to be great listeners.

The good news is that listening well is at the heart of engagement. And engagement is the key to selling retail products.

For many therapists, customer engagement is initially very difficult. But once the stress and trepidation they experience from second guessing themselves is removed, they  become the retail superstars that they are meant to be. And it happens rapidly.

Here are some tips that may help you position your team for more success in increasing your retail sales.

Tip # 1-Ask your therapists what gets in the way of their selling. Address their concerns and fears with empathy and honesty.

Tips # 2-. Divide your team into groups of three. Have them give a one minute presentation to their peers on something they love.

Tip # 3-Have the listeners repeat back what they heard the presenter say. This will help to build listening skills.

Tip # 4-In private provide positive feedback to the presenters on their presentation strengths. Guide them on improving their weaknesses.

Tip # 5-Using their strengths, repeat the presentation process using a retail product that they like. Roleplay presenting to a customer during down-time.

Join me at #ISPA2017 for Introverts: The Secret of Increasing Retail Sales.

 

High Touch-Low Engagement

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A White Paper highlighting the opinions of spa industry leaders from the Asia Pacific region was released in April 2017. From a series of round-table discussions held in Thailand, one of the resulting conclusions was that people issues are still of primary concern. Despite industry growth that far outpaces global economic growth, the ability to ensure guest satisfaction and motivating millennials remain top of mind. Read More

Real Talk-Is Your Spa Receptionist Just Pretty?

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Spa managers who achieve high retail sales know that a strong front desk team is worth their weight in gold. Conversely, show me a spa with low retail sales and chances are great that the receptionists are weak in product knowledge.

Recently I trained a city spa team with product sales that hovered around 6%. (25% and higher is ideal) Staff included three receptionists all of whom had worked there for over a year. A technique that I always use is to ask the front desk staff to tell me their complete skin care regimen based upon the products on the shelves. This does several things; it allows me to gauge their knowledge, comfort in explaining product use, enthusiasm for the brands and level of engagement.

None of the receptionists were well versed enough to inform me of an entire daily routine. Despite the fact that the spa carries only three brands, they have complete access to product samples and serve as treatment models during training, they were somewhat clueless.

I wonder what happens when guests come in to purchase products?

In contrast, high performing teams always have strong receptionists. They are more than just pretty. They’re highly engaging and product obsessed! If your guest has last minute  doubts or questions about their purchase, a good receptionist calls upon their personal experience with the products. They can provide the reassurance necessary to close the sale.

For managers with a weak front desk staff, resolving knowledge gaps and apathy is not difficult to resolve. Take these five steps:

1. Ensure that down time is spent familiarizing themselves with your products.

2. Ask product related questions frequently.

3. Conduct role play sessions with them.

4. Include product knowledge expertise as part of their performance review.

5. Create a program to incentivize sales.

This is something that you can begin today.

Consider that your front desk is first and last contact for your guests. Make the experience excellent.